I Just Bought a New Car. What Insurance Coverage Do I Need?

Congratulations! After weeks of research, comparing makes and models, and taking test drives you finally bought that brand-new car you wanted. But before you take that well-deserved road trip, check one more item off your list: the right car insurance from Jones Family Insurance!

While some auto coverage options are essential whatever the age of your car, new vehicles may carry some additional risks you should know about. So before leaving the lot, give us a quick call to discuss the possible coverage options:

New vehicle replacement. Here’s how this coverage works: If you’re the original owner of a new car that is totaled or stolen within one year of purchase, you’ll be paid the full value of the car you lost or a comparable model. Without this policy, you may have to settle for something less than new.

Loan and lease coverage. Consider what could happen if you financed your new car and then it was totaled or stolen soon after buying it. Not only would you lose your new ride, you’d still be on the hook for your entire loan balance — which would be more than the car was worth. With loan and lease coverage, you’d get a check to cover the gap between what’s left on your loan and the depreciated value of your car.

Audio-visual and custom equipment coverage. If you’re an avid music fan who enjoys a custom sound system or DVD player, this coverage protects you for the full value of any A/V equipment not installed at the factory or dealership. It also covers such modifications as roll bars, certain custom engine parts, lift kits, special wheels, artwork, decals, and other personal touches.

OEM parts replacement. OEM (original equipment manufacturer) parts are often preferable to other aftermarket parts because they are made specifically for your make and model of vehicle. So if you want your Honda repaired with Honda parts, or your Mercedes to only have official Mercedes parts, this coverage is for you. When you buy this optional coverage, it’s added to your existing Comprehensive and Collision coverage so that all repairs or replacements made to your damaged car will include new OEM parts where available.

You invested in a new car. So be sure your investment extends to the right auto policy as well. To learn more protecting your new vehicle, give us a call today at Jones Family Insurance. We serve North Port, Port Charlotte, Punta Gorda, Cape Coral and Fort Myers Florida.

Fact file: Florida hurricane insurance

November 2020

  • Six of the 10 costliest hurricanes in U.S. history have impacted Florida. Three of these storms occurred within just two years: 2004 and 2005. (See chart.)
  • The costliest hurricane, based on insured property losses to Florida, was 1992’s Hurricane Andrew. It caused $25.9 billion in damage to Florida and Louisiana (in 2019 dollars). (See chart.)
  • Standard homeowners policies typically do not cover flood damage. Flood insurance is covered by the federally managed National Flood Insurance Program, but private flood insurance is becoming increasingly available.
  • Florida leads the nation in the number of flood policies, according to the National Flood Insurance Program, with about 1.8 million policies in force in 2019.
  • About 98 percent of the total population of Florida lives in one of the coastal counties. The number of people living in coastal areas in Florida increased by 4.2 million, or 27 percent, from 15.6 million in 2000 to 19.8 million in 2015, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.
  • In Florida, 2.9 million single-family homes were at risk in 2020 for storm surge damage from hurricanes up to Category 5 strength, according to CoreLogic, Inc. These homes would cost $581 billion to completely rebuild, including labor and materials.
  • After its establishment in 2002, when the state passed legislation combining two separate high-risk insurance pools known as the Florida Windstorm Underwriting Association and the Florida Residential Property & Casualty Joint Underwriting Association, Citizens Property Insurance Corp. (CPIC) experienced exponential growth. As a result, Florida Citizens has evolved from a market of last resort to the state’s largest property insurer.
  • Florida Citizens Property Insurance Corp. provides multiperil and wind-only insurance coverage to Florida homeowners, commercial residential and commercial business property owners.
  • Direct homeowners insurance premiums in Florida written by Citizens was $490.9 million in 2018 down from $795 million in 2014.
  • Citizens was the state’s fourth leading homeowners insurer in 2018, with a market share of 5.11 percent, down from 9.1 percent in 2014.
  • Florida Citizens had 346,227 policies as of March 31, 2020.

Get you homeowners insurance, flood insurance and auto insurance from Jones Family Insurance. Serving Port Charlotte, Punta Gorda, Cape Coral and Fort Myers Florida.

The Importance of Having the Right Workers’ Compensation Coverage For Your Business

When you run a business, having the right insurance is extremely important. You can avoid so many financial burdens and protect your budget when you work with us for business insurance in Punta Gorda, FL, and throughout the state. One of the most important coverage options that all businesses must have is workers compensation.

Protect Your Employees

Whether you have 20 employees or 20,000, these people rely on your business for an income. If an employee is injured on the job and cannot work, it can be impossible for them to keep up with medical bills and still provide for their families. Having good quality workers’ compensation ensures that employees have a safety net if they are injured on the job. This can also help them recover more quickly so that they can return to work because they don’t have to worry about medical bills.

Protect Your Business

When an employee is hurt on the job, the business is held responsible. If you have good workers’ compensation coverage, you won’t have to worry about paying for medical bills out of your business’ pocket. Paying a small premium for coverage now means you won’t have to pay an exorbitant sum later.

When you need workers’ compensation coverage or any other type of business insurance for your company, rely on the agents at Jones Family Insurance. We will help you find a policy that meets your needs at a competitive rate. Contact us, Jones Family Insurance, today to get started.

The Importance of Having the Right Workers’ Compensation Coverage For Your Business – Insurance in Port Charlotte, Punta Gorda, North Port, Cape Coral, Fort Myers Florida

How to make sure your child’s car seat keeps them safe and secure on the road

Your child’s car seat is essential to their overall safety while they’re in your vehicle, but it can be easy to “set it and forget it” when it comes to a car seat, which can be detrimental to your child’s safety. As seasons change and children grow, there are some important things you should do to make sure your kids’ car seats are always prepared to do their job, whether you’re taking a quick drive to the store or heading out of town.

Consider these tips:

  1. Follow the manufacturer’s installation and maintenance instructions. While installing a car seat might look pretty straightforward, it’s important to carefully follow the manufacturer’s instructions for installation, safety checks, and maintenance. Revisit the instructions if you’re moving your car seat or lending it to the babysitter so they can drive your little one around in their own vehicle.
  2. Readjust the straps as your child grows or as seasons change. When your child grows or starts wearing different clothing as seasons change, adjust their car seat harness and check its overall fit. The harness should always be snug enough that you can’t easily grasp and pinch a horizonal fold in the top of either shoulder strap. You should also check that the harness is snug around your child’s hips and torso. If you’re adjusting the harness in colder weather, check the fit before putting on your child’s thicker layers — with a coat on, it may seemlike the harness is snug enough, but it should actually be adjusted to fit snug to your child’s body, not to the coat. Note: It’s not always safe to put your child in their car seat wearing a heavy jacket, as the impact of a collision may cause the straps to compress the material, leaving the straps too loose to keep your child secure. Some heavier coats shouldn’t be worn in a car seat at all, while others may specifically be advertised as car seat safe. Do your research before putting your child in their car seat with a winter jacket on.
  3. Keep your child in a rear-facing car seat as long as possible, but know when it’s time for a change. In the event of a crash, your child will be best protected in a rear-facing car seat, so keep your child’s seat facing the rear of your vehicle until they reach the manufacturer’s recommended maximum weight and height limits. Each province will also have its own laws in place that specify how long a child must be in a rear-facing car seat, so make yourself aware of those laws as well. When your child outgrows their rear-facing infant seat, you may want to purchase a larger rear-facing seat or convertible car seat for them to use until they’re ready to face forwards. Always follow your provincial laws and the car seat manufacturer’s instructions before changing the direction of your child’s car seat.
  4. Take note of the car seat’s expiry date and replace it on time. Every car seat has an expiry date, but maybe you’re wondering, “Do car seats really expire? Is there anything wrong with using my five-year-old’s baby car seat for my newborn?” The answer to both of these questions is yes — car seats really do expire, and it’s unsafe to use an expired car seat for a new baby. While there are several reasons you should never use an expired car seat, here are just a couple of important ones:
    • Car seat manufacturers incorporate the latest crash test data and technological advances in materials and manufacturing into their new designs, so your outdated car seat may be missing out on innovations and features that could amp up your child’s safety
    • The materials that make up a car seat can deteriorate after sitting in your vehicle for an extended period of time — especially if you live in Canada, where temperatures fluctuate significantly over the course of a year
  5. If a car seat has been involved in a collision, replace it. Whether or not your child was in the car seat at the time of the accident, there’s a chance that the seat’s safety capabilities have been compromised. Even if you can’t see signs of damage, you should properly dispose of the car seat and buy a new one — you’ll likely be able to claimopens a pop-up with definition of claim this purchase through your car insurance company. Never give away or leave a car seat at the side of the road if it has been involved in a collision.

Jones Family Insurance serving Punta Gorda, Port Charlotte, Fort Myers Florida

 

Black Friday car accidents: what’s at stake?

How Your Insurance May Play a Role in Black Friday Mishaps

This post is part of a series of insurance blogs on jonesfamilyins.com 

Scoring a bargain on Black Friday feels great. Not so great? Waiting in long lines. Getting into an altercation with another shopper. Fighting for a parking spot.

It may all be enough to convince you to stay home on America’s favorite shopping day. However, if you do decide to head out into the fray, watch out for these potential causes of Black Friday trouble to help keep you, your vehicle, and your gifts secure.

Driving Drowsy: At-Fault Accidents

One of the most common problems with driving on Black Friday is it’s so darn early. At 3 a.m., shoppers might not be alert enough to operate a vehicle safely, and you don’t risk just getting into an accident. You risk your car insurance rates going up afterward, as well, especially if you are found at fault for the accident. Now there’s a sleeper hit you don’t want!

Even worse, someone could be seriously hurt. In 2018, a Florida teen fell asleep at the wheel coming home from a Black Friday shopping trip. He died, and his four passengers were hospitalized.

Road Rage: Potentially No Coverage for Intentional Acts

Everybody wants the best spot in the parking lot, and, on Black Friday, emotions run high. It’s unfortunately not hard to imagine another shopper hitting the gas instead of the brakes and ramming into the side of your car as you pull into a spot she wanted. Talk about a bad case of road rage. But, wait, it gets worse. Since she intentionally rammed your car, the incident may not receive any coverage under her auto insurance. Insurance, after all, is for accidents, not intentional acts.

If her car insurance will not cover the damage to your car, you’ll have to seek coverage under your own policy. You would need collision coverage on your auto policy in order to do so. Collision covers damage to your own vehicle in many instances when you are not afforded coverage under someone else’s policy. You may also choose to sue for damages.

Parking Lot Accidents: Don’t Go It Alone

Of course, actual accidents happen in parking lots, too. If you’re involved in a fender bender, be sure to involve your insurance carrier too. It may seem minor enough to handle on your own, but remember that injuries can be serious, even at low speeds, and may not show up for days. Plus, what if the other person changes his mind about how much of a settlement he expects from you or about how much he agrees to pay to you? All of a sudden, you do want your carrier involved. However, your prior interactions with the other party, or your delay in reporting the accident, may have compromised your ability to obtain coverage under your policy.

You may not even know who hit your vehicle. In the case of a hit and run, alert both your insurance carrier and the police. A hit and run is a crime, and a police report may be helpful in the claims adjustment process.

No matter the type of accident, ask around for witnesses. Document everything you can. Jot down the location, nature of damage, and approximate time of the accident. Use your phone to photograph the accident scene and the damage to your car.

Stolen Gifts: Theft Paired With Vehicle Damage

Imagine you get up hours before dawn, spend the whole morning shopping for the perfect gifts, and then find that you were robbed. Some Grinch has stolen Christmas right out of your back window!

Gifts are considered personal property, and a renters, condo, or homeowners policy covers the cost of replacing personal property in many instances. If your vehicle was damaged in the process, such as a broken window, you’ll have to rely on the “other than collision” (commonly known as “comprehensive”) coverage on your auto insurance policy for your vehicle damage. This coverage typically isn’t required by state law so be sure to check that you have it, as well as collision and other desired coverage, before an incident occurs.
Of course, these are just a handful of Black Friday scenarios. It’s a jungle out there in the malls, so stay alert and stay safe. And, remember: a little bit of patience goes a long way on Black Friday – or any day.

Happy shopping!

Contact Jones Family Insurance for all your insurance needs! Serving all of Southwest Florida. Insurance near me.

What you need to know about remote working risks

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has suddenly turned working from home from a privilege to a necessity.

While you’re helping keep employees healthy and productive (and employed), you must also consider the potential liability of remote work.

From a safety perspective, you need to know:

  • what your business insurance covers when employees are working remotely, and
  • how to ensure you’re protected against losses from worker injuries, data breaches, business property damage, and more.

Let’s review some of the biggest risks of stay-at-home workers, and how to guard against them.

What if an employee is injured or gets sick while working from home?

Most states require businesses with employees to carry workers’ compensation insurance. This policy covers lost wages and medical bills for employees who are injured or become ill on the job. It also covers lawsuit costs if an injured employee sues your business.

While workers’ comp laws vary by state, the insurance generally covers telecommuters. If a remote employee is injured at home and files a claim, they must prove that the incident occurred during business hours while performing work duties.

It’s unlikely a remote employee who contracts COVID-19 could prove they became ill because of their job. But If you have a coronavirus-related claim, call your insurance agent to verify workers’ comp laws in your geographic area and the terms of your policy.

These guidelines may not apply to every person working from home for your business. Contractors (1099 workers) and freelancers are not eligible for benefits under your workers’ compensation policy.

How to protect remote workers from cyberattacks and data breaches

Nearly 90% of IT leaders feel that virtual employees may not be secure working from their home network. Their pessimism is justified.

When employees work from home, the threat of cyberattacks and data breaches skyrockets. To protect your business and remote workers from cyberattacks like hacking, malware, or phishing, make sure employees:

  • access company applications and resources through an encrypted virtual private network (VPN)
  • have updated antivirus and firewall software on their computers
  • use strong passwords and regularly change them
  • lock their computers and mobile devices when they take breaks
  • know how to identify and avoid phishing attempts and other scams

You can also consider password managers or SSO (single sign-on) software across your company to authenticate users and reduce vulnerabilities.

How to minimize losses if your company is the victim of a cyberattack

If a malicious software attack or data breach does occur on a remote employee’s work computer, cyber liability insurance will cover the damages.

This insurance comes in two varieties:

  • First-party cyber liability insurance covers damages from a data breach on your own systems. This includes the costs of notifying affected customers and paying for credit and fraud monitoring.
  • Third-party cyber liability insurance provides protection when a data breach compromises your clients’ systems and information. The coverage applies whether it happens at your place of business or remotely. If a client sues your business over a data breach, third-party cyber liability insurance will pay for attorney’s fees, court costs, and any damages.

For IT businesses, most insurance providers will bundle both types of cyber liability policies with technology errors and omissions insurance.

Commercial property insurance may not cover remote business assets

If you have equipment, inventory, or other assets you want to protect, having commercial property insurance is a must. This coverage reimburses you for business property that is lost, damaged, or stolen from your office.

But does this policy cover items as you and your workers make the transition to remote work? It depends.

Many remote employees aren’t covered while working from home. Standard commercial property insurance generally covers property that is on the premises of your office or facility. But it may exclude or significantly reduce coverage for property away from the office.

Double-check that your commercial property insurance covers business property used off-site by remote workers. An employee’s homeowner’s insurance policy typically won’t pay to replace a business-owned laptop that was stolen or damaged outside the office.

Ensure you have the right insurance for employees, data, and equipment

As you adjust to shelter-in-place and stay-at-home orders to prevent the spread of COVID-19, you may need to adapt to remote work for the long haul.

Talk to your insurance agent at Jones Family Insurance to make sure you have the proper coverage to protect against telecommuting risks. Having to pay out of pocket for uncovered losses will only cause your business more financial hardship down the line.

Jones Family Insurance – Serving Punta Gorda, Cape Coral and Fort Myers Florida

Top Reminders for Teen Drivers

If there’s one thing that research points out, it’s that teens are, literally, the worst drivers. According to the CDC, motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death for teenagers, and the risk of motor vehicle crashes is higher among teens aged 16-19 than among any other age group. So while your teen is probably thrilled to be driving, and you’re probably thrilled to not be driving them everywhere, it’s important to continue teaching them how to stay safe and smart on the road. Luckily, teenagers are stubborn but still pretty impressionable. Here are the most important things you can instill in your brand new teenage driver, and guidelines to have them follow.

Start slowly: A teenager with a brand new driver’s license is even more likely to get into an accident than her slightly older counterparts. For the first few months, limit excursions to simple trips during the daytime with few or no passengers.

Wear a seatbelt: Despite all our warnings, many teenagers are going to get into accidents. Wearing a seatbelt greatly reduces their chance of death or serious injury if they do. The best way to instill this habit is to insist that your children wear a seatbelt 100 percent of the time, well before they become teenagers and for you to do it as well.

Don’t text: Distracted driving has become just as deadly as driving while tired or intoxicated. Research by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety found that distraction was a factor in 58 percent of crashes involving teen drivers. Show your teen how to use smartphone settings for driving, and teach them never to text and drive, period.

Set rules about passengers: When it comes to driving with a teenager, not all passengers are created equal. Teens are much more likely to have an accident when they’re transporting other teens. In addition, some provisional licenses have limits on the number or type of passengers a teen can drive with. Be crystal clear with your teen about who they can have in the car and under what circumstances, and don’t be afraid to say no to letting them drive with certain friends.

Practice for peer pressure: When the risk is of looking uncool or not fitting in, it can be overwhelmingly hard for a teenager to say “no” to giving an obnoxious friend a ride home, making an extra stop, or to getting in the car with someone who has been drinking. Brainstorm and practice for these difficult situations so that your teen will be able to hold their boundaries and confidently say no when it really matters.

Make it safe to call: Your teen needs to know that, no matter what, they can call you for help if they get into a situation where they can’t or don’t want to drive.

Don’t speed: Speeding and tailgating greatly increases the chance of an accident for a teen driver. Make sure your teen knows that getting there late is OK if it means getting there safe.

Respect road conditions: Driving at night or in bad weather are two high-risk scenarios for new, young drivers. Of course, it’s important that your teen gets to practice in difficult conditions, but make sure they know to be extra-vigilant and that it’s perfectly acceptable to wait for things to improve.

For all of your insurance questions, call or Jones Family Insurance today. Serving All of Southwest Florida.

Florida Governor Supports Liability Protection

As we’ve reported over the summer, work has continued behind the scenes among some Florida legislators and other elected officials to craft a bill that would provide liability protection for businesses related to the coronavirus pandemic.  Now, Governor DeSantis has weighed-in, saying he would favor such a bill.

The Governor last week told reporters that fear of lawsuits is holding back the economy – specifically, businesses’ concern that they could be sued and found liable for an employee or customer contracting the coronavirus from their business.  While noting that would be a difficult thing to prove, the Governor said the legislature could take up such a bill in a late November special session that’s he pushing to consider his disorderly protestors plan.

States across the country are increasingly looking at providing businesses some liability protection from COVID-19.   Nevada recently passed first of its kind legislation to shield its casinos and hospitality industry from such lawsuits.  The law requires those businesses to follow public health recommendations and provide free testing and paid time off to employees who test positive and are quarantined.

In Florida, where tourism and hospitality is the largest industry, state Senator Jeff Brandes (R-Pinellas) is continuing to work with colleagues and state cabinet members to draft a bill to provide protection for a broad range of businesses.  The goal is to eliminate incentives for lawyers to engage in predatory practices, while still allowing legitimate lawsuits with clear reckless disregard to proceed.

The Governor’s comments came in the same week that he ordered Florida into the third phase of coronarvirus economic recovery, opening up all restaurants, bars, and other businesses to 100% capacity.   He said the move was meant to ensure “business certainty” going forward.   While Florida’s economic recovery continues, the latest report shows state tax collections were down 4.6% in August from August 2019 and unemployment at 7.4%.

Contact Jones Family Insurance for all your insurance needs. Serving Port Charlotte, Punta Gorda and Fort Myers Florida.

Hurricane Sally left 500,000 without power!

Hurricane Sally came through! The most severe wind damage seemed to be limited to areas near the coast or open bay waters.  What I saw was mostly minor damage to roofs and siding, seldom structural, let alone catastrophic.  At one point though, more than 500,000 residents were without power in Florida and neighboring Alabama, where the Cat 2 storm made official landfall, with maximum winds of 105 mph and up to 30 inches of rainfall.  Storm surge was upwards of 7 feet in coastal Escambia County (Pensacola) and adjacent Baldwin County, Alabama.

AIR Worldwide, the Verisk catastrophe risk modeling firm, estimates Sally’s insured losses will range from $1 billion to $3 billion, with wind representing the majority of losses.  This is exclusive of National Flood Insurance Program losses, which are expected to be especially steep in Alabama, given more than two thirds of flood coverage there is federal.  AIR’s estimates include residential, commercial, industrial, and automobile property losses including contents.  Last Monday includes pictures of flood inundation of upwards of three feet in downtown Pensacola and exclusive drone video and images from a few hours after Sally made landfall on September 16.  You’ll also see the unfortunate damage caused by a loose barge to the newly built southbound span of the Pensacola Bay Bridge, linking Pensacola to Gulf Breeze, on the barrier beach.

 

Two big trees that seemed to know to fall away from nearby townhouses in the aftermath of Hurricane Sally in Pensacola, FL, September 21, 2020.

 

FEMA last week approved a major disaster declaration for the storm.  It includes public assistance for all categories in Escambia County and public assistance Category B (emergency protective measures) for Bay, Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson, Liberty, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa, Walton, and Washington counties.  The Florida Division of Emergency Management is continuing to conduct damage assessments in the 12 counties that did not receive all categories of Public Assistance.  The Division is also conducting damage assessments at individual residences and businesses and will continue to work with FEMA to apply for Individual Assistance.

The Governor has activated the Florida Small Business Emergency Bridge Loan program through the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity to support small businesses impacted by Hurricane Sally.  The program provides short-term loans up to $50,000, or in special cases $100,000, if warranted by the needs of the business.

 

Courtesy, AccuWeather

So we begin another process of filing and processing insurance claims.  The state has activated the Emergency Adjuster Licensing System to boost the number of insurance adjusters available to help residents with claims.  There are more than 150,000 adjusters currently licensed in Florida.  This activation allows insurance companies to bring in catastrophe adjusters from other states to help handle the increased demand.  Sally was the eighth named Atlantic storm to make landfall in the U.S. this hurricane season.

Contact Jones Family Insurance for all your Insurance needs. Serving Punta Gorda and Fort Myers Florida.

Basics of car maintenance: 8 tips to follow

We rely on cars a lot in our day-to-day lives and sometimes we put them through a lot… hot summer days, icy winter conditions, kicked-up rocks, potholes and more. Because your car may be one of your biggest expenses, knowing the basics of car maintenance can help you save on car costs. Even the basics, like changing your oil, checking your tire pressure and getting scheduled inspections, will help your car run smoother down the road.

Keep your car a well-oiled machine by following these eight maintenance tips:

  1. Check the oil. One of the most important things you can do for your car is to make sure the engine has the right type and amount of engine oil. Check your owner’s manual for recommendations. Routine oil and filter changes can remove particles and sludge and keep your engine in peak condition. The frequency of oil changes varies by vehicle, but a general recommendation is every 3,000-7,500 miles. You can check the oil level between oil changes using the dipstick – make sure your car is turned off before doing so. See other tips for safely checking your oil, too.
  2. Test the battery. Car batteries last an average of two to five years. You can promote longer battery life by testing the output voltage level with a car battery tester or multimeter. The battery voltage reading will show how “charged” the battery is. Consult your owner’s manual or mechanic if the battery test indicates it’s not at an optimal level.
  3. Top off fluids. From lubricating to cooling, your car’s fluids have important jobs to do. Refill fluids at the start of summer to prevent overheating, and check the levels again at the end of fall.
  4. Run the heater and AC. There’s nothing worse than turning on the air conditioning for that first hot day, only to have more hot air blown your way. Malfunctioning climate control could mean larger issues like a leak in the system. Keep your car comfortable and your heater/AC running smoothly by testing it periodically.
  5. Check the tire pressure. As the temperature rises and falls throughout the year, your tire pressure can fluctuate. Improperly inflated tires can affect a car’s handling, lower your gas mileage, increase wear and even lead to a blown tire. Check the recommended psi on the sticker commonly found inside the driver’s door. If there’s no sticker adhered to the driver’s door or side, check your owner’s manual. Adjust tire pressure accordingly. While you’re at it, check your tire tread and look for other wear or damage.
  6. Inspect the brakes. The best way to care for car brakes is by sticking to the suggested maintenance schedule from your car’s manual. Following a routine car maintenance schedule can prevent catastrophic brake failure and expensive repairs.
  7. Repair scratches and rust. Scratches can lead to peeling paint, peeling paint can lead to rust and rust can lead to structural damage on a vehicle. Improve your car’s appearance and longevity by fixing scratches and rust when they appear.
  8. Keep an emergency kit. Be prepared at any point by storing a car emergency kit with extra fluids, cables, tools, a spare tire and more in your trunk.

Along with following the basics of car maintenance, protect your vehicle with an auto insurance policy. Get your auto insurance quote at Jones Family Insurance. Serving Punta Gorda to Fort Myers.